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The Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies at New York University was created in 1966 to foster the interdisciplinary study of the modern and contemporary Middle East and to enhance public understanding of the region. The Kevorkian Center's activities focus on the histories, politics, economies, religions, cultures and languages of the area stretching from North Africa to Central Asia, and on the historical processes that have shaped the present.

Upcoming Events

  • Monday, October 5, 5:00 p.m.

    Notes from the Field: The Translator's Authority

    Nader Uthman, Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, New York University

  • Thursday, October 8, 12:30 p.m.

    Aman My Pasha! Time is Precious and Short

    Mostafa Minawi, History, Cornell University

  • Thursday, October 8, 5:00 p.m.

    Women's Worlds in Qajar Iran

    Afsaneh Najmabadi, Harvard University
    Azadeh Tajpour, Visual Artist
    Maryam Momeni, University of Vienna

  • Friday, October 9, 6:00 p.m.


    (India, 2014, 96 min) A film by Abhay Kumar
    At one of the most prestigious medical schools in India, violent events inspired the filmmaker to follow four students for two years, providing insight into a remarkable place where the pressure to achieve is unprecedented.
    With South Asia @NYU and Cinema Studies

  • Wednesday, October 14, 6:30 p.m.

    The Fabulous Life and Thoughts of Ahmad Fardid

    film screening and panel discussion
    Ali Mirsepassi, Gallatin, NYU
    Richard Wolin, History and Political Science, CUNY Graduate Center
    Andrew Arato, Sociology, New School
    Asef Bayat, Sociology and Middle East Studies, University of Illinois
    With the Iranian Studies Initiative, the Gallatin School for individualized Study, and the Urban Democracy Lab

  • Thursday, October 15, 12:30 p.m.

    The Politics of the Square in the Arab Revolutions

    Asef Bayat, Sociology and Middle East Studies, University of Illinois
    Recent uprisings in the Middle East-- the 2009 Green Movement in Iran, the Arab revolutions, and Gezi episodes mostly took shape in the urban spaces. What does this tell us about the roots and processes of these social upheavals in the region where still over 40% of people live in the rural settings? More specifically, what aspects of urbanity render the city, in particular these cities, spaces of contention? And why are certain urban sites prone to mobilization more than others?

  • Thursday, October 15, 6:00 p.m.

    Film Arabi (Arab Movie)

    (Israel, 2015, 60 min) a film by Eyal Sagui Bezawe & Sara Tsifroni
    A Friday afternoon ritual in 1970s Israel was to watch the weekly Arabic movie (usually Egyptian) broadcast on Israeli TV, despite Egypt being Israel’s arch enemy. This film traces how Israelis became devoted fans of Egyptian movies as a window into a world that most failed to see and understand.
    After-film discussion with filmmakers Eyal Sagui Bezawe and Osnat Trabelsi
    With the Taub Center for Israel Studies, the Center for Religion and Media and the Center for Media, Culture, and History and the Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies

Complete List of Events

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